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Proper Way To Tie Down

#1 User is offline   RockTime 

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Posted 20 June 2009 - 03:04 PM

with the majority of us trailoring to the trails this is important info to read.......

People tend to ignore the "what if?" scenario because it takes additional time and money to do it right. Or in some cases, ignorance plays a part in the equation. However, one thing remains constant; Individual state laws as well as the National Transportation Safety Administration define a very specific blueprint for those of us who tow. Without reciting the actual regulation as written in the NHTSA handbook, we'll just say it like this: regardless of anchoring method (e.g., chain, ratchet strap, etc.) you must use a minimum of four individual attachment points (per vehicle) with an acceptable weight rating if you plan to tow a vehicle on our nation's roadways. That means two individual points up front and two more out back. If one strap should become loose or break altogether the opposite side is there to maintain tension on the load.

To take this one step further, we recommend that each strap or chain be attached to the opposite corner of the towed vehicle. Simply put, make an "x" at each end of the vehicle when tying down your rig. The "x" technique also ensures that the vehicle cannot move laterally on the deck of the trailer during an evasive maneuver.

Other important considerations about ratchet straps:

* When ratcheting the excess slack of a strap, be sure that the strap makes at least two complete revolutions around the spool or drum of the ratcheting mechanism; this will prevent strap slippage.

* When purchasing straps, be sure that the webbing is indeed rated for the maximum weight you intend to tow. A good rule of thumb is to size your anchoring straps to the maximum weight of your trailer, or if you have multiple trailers, use straps with roughly double the burst strength of the weight of your vehicle.

* Stick with polyester webbing material over nylon. Polyester has less of a tendency to stretch when force is applied to it.

* Develop a habit of using individual axle straps with protective sleeves at each corner.

* Make sure the ratchet straps you use have positive-locking snap-style hooks to ensure the straps stay connected in the case of a load shift.

* Never allow webbing-type tie-down straps to rub against metal or other abrasive surfaces when securing a vehicle to a trailer.

* When excess webbing material exists after the strap is tightened, be sure to tie it up to prevent it from flapping around in the wind.

* When not in use, store webbing-type tie-down straps in a location that protects them from sunlight, chemicals and moisture.

* Never rely on a winch to secure your rig to the trailer. It's bad for the winch's braking mechanism and there is no guarantee that it will hold.
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#2 User is offline   Joe Dillard 

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 12:37 AM

Those are some excellent tips!

#3 User is offline   JeepDew 

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 07:45 AM

were is the best place to buy these straps
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#4 User is offline   Moose512 

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 12:37 PM

View PostJeepDew, on Jul 16 2009, 08:45 AM, said:

were is the best place to buy these straps

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#5 User is offline   TallJeep 

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 01:16 PM

View PostJeepDew, on Jul 16 2009, 08:45 AM, said:

were is the best place to buy these straps

There's a place off Stirling RD west of 95 that will custom make straps, I had mine done there and I paid $15 for each. You can have them put hooks, rings or any end you want.
I'll post the exact address when I get home tonight

Gus

#6 User is offline   HitMoney 

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 01:55 PM

View PostTallJeep, on Jul 16 2009, 02:16 PM, said:

There's a place off Stirling RD west of 95 that will custom make straps, I had mine done there and I paid $15 for each. You can have them put hooks, rings or any end you want.
I'll post the exact address when I get home tonight

Gus

Huh.. I am interested in that.. What are your straps rated at? Are they Poly or Nylon?
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#7 User is offline   starnesc 

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 01:11 PM

View PostTallJeep, on Jul 16 2009, 01:16 PM, said:

There's a place off Stirling RD west of 95 that will custom make straps, I had mine done there and I paid $15 for each. You can have them put hooks, rings or any end you want.
I'll post the exact address when I get home tonight

Gus

Were you able to find that address?

#8 User is offline   LostJ 

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 07:58 PM

Is it better to tie down on the axle or frame?
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#9 User is offline   RockTime 

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 09:59 PM

View PostLostJ, on Jan 26 2010, 07:58 PM, said:

Is it better to tie down on the axle or frame?

axle
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#10 User is offline   Jim B 

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 08:55 AM

View PostLostJ, on Jan 26 2010, 07:58 PM, said:

Is it better to tie down on the axle or frame?

There are many way to tie down, there have been discussions all over on which is best. I think there might have been some topics here in the past with regards to this, if not it makes for a good discussion.

I guess according to RockTime... I (and a few of the people that I have been wheeling with for years) have been doing it wrong since 1996. :2thumup:

We tie only to the frame. When you travel long distances by doing it this way you secure the suspension instead of having it bounce all over the place. It also allows a "very slight" movement on hard braking and pot holes allowing it to give releasing a tiny bit of stress. I don't like yanking on the axle tubes as the axles as well as the suspension are both very dear to me. :2thumup:

Does tying to the axle make it wrong, I guess not because many do it this way. It is my option not to from what I have seen over the years. :ya:
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#11 User is offline   ChuckieB 

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 10:16 AM

I've always tied down on the axles! I've always been told that by tying down on the frame you are causing the suspension to be compressed, so every time you hit a bump or turn a corner you are depending on the straps to hold the compressed object, which adds a lot more stress on your tie downs. If a strap should happen to give and the compressed suspension releases it's energy at the right time could pose an unsafe condition. Just saying.........

#12 User is offline   Jim B 

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 10:50 AM

View PostChuckieB, on Jan 28 2010, 10:16 AM, said:

I've always been told that by tying down on the frame you are causing the suspension to be compressed

Minimal at best and has not harm my original suspension that has been on there for years.

Quote

so every time you hit a bump or turn a corner you are depending on the straps to hold the compressed object, which adds a lot more stress on your tie downs.

Just like anything else you must service or replace strap as needed. I've seen people tie down to the frame with chains as well.

Quote

If a strap should happen to give and the compressed suspension releases it's energy at the right time could pose an unsafe condition

See my prior answer. I rather replace a strap when needed to avoid this scenario than damage my axle or suspension over the long term by tying chains at the axles. (have seen a few) You don't want straps rubbing against metal.

Does it make it wrong the way you do it... no. That is just the way you thought it would be best and it seems to be working for you for now. :2thumup:
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#13 User is offline   ChuckieB 

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Posted 28 January 2010 - 11:44 AM

Your are correct, it's trial and error and we all go by what we have learned. Actually, if you talk with any shock manufacturer they recommend tying down to the frame to save wear and tare on the shocks!

#14 User is offline   Dome 

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 01:58 PM

I've tied to the frame for all the reason Jim B has pointed out. The 18 wheel car hauler all tie there cars down by the frame. For me the fact that the Jeep isn't bouncing around on the trailer is a big plus, but at the end of the day it's your preference. Try it both ways and see what you like the most.
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#15 User is offline   Krocker 

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 11:27 PM

I've tied to the frame for all the reason Jim B has pointed out. The 18 wheel car hauler all tie there cars down by the frame. For me the fact that the Jeep isn't bouncing around on the trailer is a big plus, but at the end of the day it's your preference. Try it both ways and see what you like the most.


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