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The case for GMRS radio Onfprmation on GMRS that I have learned.

#1 User is offline   Stretchman 

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 11:47 AM

Hi. Let me intorduce myself. My name is Curtis, and I am a licensed amateur radio operator. But I first got my start in C.B. back in the 70s, when licenses were still required. Back then C.B. was a very civil, and usable band. Since deregulation, not as much. But CB continues to be one of the most, if not the most, popular communications radios in the world. The reason is that it is very effective, and pretty reliable for every day use.

Now, the FCC has changed the regulations for GMRS. GMRS requires a license. The license cost is 85 dollars. It is good for 5 years, and covers everyone in your household. So, basically, when you buy a license, you buy it for the whole family. Most GMRS radios have the capability to communicate with FRS radios too. A lot of people use these when they are camping, and/or hunting/fishing/hiking...

There are basically 2 types of radios used in this service. Typically, the bubble pack variety of frs/gmrs radios is about 5oomw up to about 5 watts. Most of these are channelized and have fixed anteenas that you don't want to play with at UHF frequencies unless you know what you are doing, and even then, it's against the regs.

The 500mw verions are FRS radios, and have some interstitial channels that can also communicate with GMRS RADIOS. As long as the GMRS radio user has a license, there is nothing wrong with this type of communication. So, chatting with the family, keeping track of the kids, etc, is easily accomplished with the basic bubble pack variety. The good news is that they will work for basic comms, up to about 1/2 mile. Some are ok, some not as good.

The GMRS handhelds, which require a lciense to use, are more capable, and can do between 2-3 watts on the average. They also have GMRS only chgannels which can be used, and additional options which we'll get to later, like pl tones and stuff.

Then there are the real gmrs radios. Mil-Spec, dealer programmable rigs with selectable power, detachable antennas, and up to 50 watts. There are also repeater systems that can be used with these radios. 50 watts, can reliably get your signal out about 20 miles in urban terrain. Differeing conditions off road will dictate how far they will talk, and elevation and line of sight come into play as well. But all in all, a better radio than an ordinary CB, because it is not nearly as susceptible to interference from skip/DX that rolls in from wherever whenever the band is open.

Should you keep your CB? I would. But GMRS radios are something to think about. BTW, they do not license clubs, or businesses in GMRS. They are an individual/family license issue only.

Hope this helps you somewhat in your understanding of it. I am just recently licensed in it, and as I learn, I will share.
Stretchman

08 JK X with extras.

#2 User is offline   raulam65 

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 12:47 PM

View PostStretchman, on Feb 9 2009, 11:47 AM, said:

Hi. Let me intorduce myself. My name is Curtis, and I am a licensed amateur radio operator. But I first got my start in C.B. back in the 70s, when licenses were still required. Back then C.B. was a very civil, and usable band. Since deregulation, not as much. But CB continues to be one of the most, if not the most, popular communications radios in the world. The reason is that it is very effective, and pretty reliable for every day use.

Now, the FCC has changed the regulations for GMRS. GMRS requires a license. The license cost is 85 dollars. It is good for 5 years, and covers everyone in your household. So, basically, when you buy a license, you buy it for the whole family. Most GMRS radios have the capability to communicate with FRS radios too. A lot of people use these when they are camping, and/or hunting/fishing/hiking...

There are basically 2 types of radios used in this service. Typically, the bubble pack variety of frs/gmrs radios is about 5oomw up to about 5 watts. Most of these are channelized and have fixed anteenas that you don't want to play with at UHF frequencies unless you know what you are doing, and even then, it's against the regs.

The 500mw verions are FRS radios, and have some interstitial channels that can also communicate with GMRS RADIOS. As long as the GMRS radio user has a license, there is nothing wrong with this type of communication. So, chatting with the family, keeping track of the kids, etc, is easily accomplished with the basic bubble pack variety. The good news is that they will work for basic comms, up to about 1/2 mile. Some are ok, some not as good.

The GMRS handhelds, which require a lciense to use, are more capable, and can do between 2-3 watts on the average. They also have GMRS only chgannels which can be used, and additional options which we'll get to later, like pl tones and stuff.

Then there are the real gmrs radios. Mil-Spec, dealer programmable rigs with selectable power, detachable antennas, and up to 50 watts. There are also repeater systems that can be used with these radios. 50 watts, can reliably get your signal out about 20 miles in urban terrain. Differeing conditions off road will dictate how far they will talk, and elevation and line of sight come into play as well. But all in all, a better radio than an ordinary CB, because it is not nearly as susceptible to interference from skip/DX that rolls in from wherever whenever the band is open.

Should you keep your CB? I would. But GMRS radios are something to think about. BTW, they do not license clubs, or businesses in GMRS. They are an individual/family license issue only.

Hope this helps you somewhat in your understanding of it. I am just recently licensed in it, and as I learn, I will share.


I own a handheld GPS unit from Garmin that also includes a 5 watt (I believe) GMRS radio. I was not aware that there was a licensure requirement. I use the unit constantly when I'm hunting at Corbett....am I in violation of FCC regs?
-2004 LJ - 1" BL, 5.5 RE extreme duty long arm kit, magnaflow catback, ARB snorkel, Pro-comp 35's, 16 x 10 pro-comp series 8179 xtreme alloy rims. Warn 9.5Ti winch and rear bumper with tailgate. Front/rear Detroit Truetracs with 4.88 gears.

-2007 BMW 650i

-2006 Infiniti QX56

#3 User is offline   raulam65 

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 12:53 PM

View PostStretchman, on Feb 9 2009, 11:47 AM, said:

Hi. Let me intorduce myself. My name is Curtis, and I am a licensed amateur radio operator. But I first got my start in C.B. back in the 70s, when licenses were still required. Back then C.B. was a very civil, and usable band. Since deregulation, not as much. But CB continues to be one of the most, if not the most, popular communications radios in the world. The reason is that it is very effective, and pretty reliable for every day use.

Now, the FCC has changed the regulations for GMRS. GMRS requires a license. The license cost is 85 dollars. It is good for 5 years, and covers everyone in your household. So, basically, when you buy a license, you buy it for the whole family. Most GMRS radios have the capability to communicate with FRS radios too. A lot of people use these when they are camping, and/or hunting/fishing/hiking...

There are basically 2 types of radios used in this service. Typically, the bubble pack variety of frs/gmrs radios is about 5oomw up to about 5 watts. Most of these are channelized and have fixed anteenas that you don't want to play with at UHF frequencies unless you know what you are doing, and even then, it's against the regs.

The 500mw verions are FRS radios, and have some interstitial channels that can also communicate with GMRS RADIOS. As long as the GMRS radio user has a license, there is nothing wrong with this type of communication. So, chatting with the family, keeping track of the kids, etc, is easily accomplished with the basic bubble pack variety. The good news is that they will work for basic comms, up to about 1/2 mile. Some are ok, some not as good.

The GMRS handhelds, which require a lciense to use, are more capable, and can do between 2-3 watts on the average. They also have GMRS only chgannels which can be used, and additional options which we'll get to later, like pl tones and stuff.

Then there are the real gmrs radios. Mil-Spec, dealer programmable rigs with selectable power, detachable antennas, and up to 50 watts. There are also repeater systems that can be used with these radios. 50 watts, can reliably get your signal out about 20 miles in urban terrain. Differeing conditions off road will dictate how far they will talk, and elevation and line of sight come into play as well. But all in all, a better radio than an ordinary CB, because it is not nearly as susceptible to interference from skip/DX that rolls in from wherever whenever the band is open.

Should you keep your CB? I would. But GMRS radios are something to think about. BTW, they do not license clubs, or businesses in GMRS. They are an individual/family license issue only.

Hope this helps you somewhat in your understanding of it. I am just recently licensed in it, and as I learn, I will share.


p.s. before you ask, it's the Garmin RINO 530 HCx....(FRS/GMRS)
-2004 LJ - 1" BL, 5.5 RE extreme duty long arm kit, magnaflow catback, ARB snorkel, Pro-comp 35's, 16 x 10 pro-comp series 8179 xtreme alloy rims. Warn 9.5Ti winch and rear bumper with tailgate. Front/rear Detroit Truetracs with 4.88 gears.

-2007 BMW 650i

-2006 Infiniti QX56

#4 User is offline   Stretchman 

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 10:04 PM

That radio says it's transmitting on interstitial (FRS) channels at 2 watts. IIRC, there's a low power switch that allows you to run it as an FRS unit, but I might be mistaken.

IF you want a GMRS license, then just go to the fcc web page and sign up for it. It'll process quickly through the ULS, and you'll have your license number way before you see your hard copy. IF there's any doubt, better safe than sorry. And then, you can use high power all you want to. It also covers anyoner else in your family that might use it too. So, you only need one license.
Stretchman

08 JK X with extras.

#5 User is offline   Stretchman 

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 10:11 PM

BTW, really nice radio. Me like.
Stretchman

08 JK X with extras.

#6 User is offline   raulam65 

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 12:32 PM

View PostStretchman, on Feb 11 2009, 10:11 PM, said:

BTW, really nice radio. Me like.


I got the license yesterday and should hav my call sing today. After I purcahsed it, I did further research, only to find out that 20-50 million GMRS units (bubble pack and others) have been sold, but there are only 80,000 individual GMRS licenses......that puts it at approximately 440 units per licensee....I guess somebodies' using them illegally : ) I do like my handheld....this thing never loses satellite lock....ever.
-2004 LJ - 1" BL, 5.5 RE extreme duty long arm kit, magnaflow catback, ARB snorkel, Pro-comp 35's, 16 x 10 pro-comp series 8179 xtreme alloy rims. Warn 9.5Ti winch and rear bumper with tailgate. Front/rear Detroit Truetracs with 4.88 gears.

-2007 BMW 650i

-2006 Infiniti QX56

#7 User is offline   Stretchman 

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 01:53 PM

YUeah, enforcement is kind of lax. But operating illegally is like, a 10,000 dollar fine and other penalties. Will the FCC respond? It's anyone's guess. Best bet is to simply get the license. And if more people do, characteristically, the FCC will reduce the fees for it as it pays for itself.

Welcome to gmrs. Took about 10 days to get the license hard copy, but you should be able to download and print a reference copy sometime today.

BTW, what kind of signal range do you get between radios?
Stretchman

08 JK X with extras.

#8 User is offline   raulam65 

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 02:41 PM

View PostStretchman, on Feb 12 2009, 01:53 PM, said:

YUeah, enforcement is kind of lax. But operating illegally is like, a 10,000 dollar fine and other penalties. Will the FCC respond? It's anyone's guess. Best bet is to simply get the license. And if more people do, characteristically, the FCC will reduce the fees for it as it pays for itself.

Welcome to gmrs. Took about 10 days to get the license hard copy, but you should be able to download and print a reference copy sometime today.

BTW, what kind of signal range do you get between radios?


At Corbett, about a mile (verified). I haven't tested it any further. Out on the highway, it's been tested ot to about 5 miles...
-2004 LJ - 1" BL, 5.5 RE extreme duty long arm kit, magnaflow catback, ARB snorkel, Pro-comp 35's, 16 x 10 pro-comp series 8179 xtreme alloy rims. Warn 9.5Ti winch and rear bumper with tailgate. Front/rear Detroit Truetracs with 4.88 gears.

-2007 BMW 650i

-2006 Infiniti QX56

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